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Finally. The First Full-Day Octalysis Gamification Design Workshop

Yu kai Chou Workshop Finally. The First Full Day Octalysis Gamification Design Workshop

The most comprehensive Gamification Workshop on Octalysis yet

If you have been frustrated that all my talks, my videos, and my blogposts are all cover the same basic foundations of Octalysis, and really want to learn more about deeper level Octalysis and Gamification Design, this is your opportunity.

This is the first public full-day workshop dedicated for Octalysis and is meant to really get attendees to be able to design sophisticated motivation and engagement systems in the realms of product design, marketing, culture design, healthcare, and education.

This workshop will also be the first time ever I will be teaching how to design an experience using Level 4 Octalysis, something that is powerful and ensures that each component of the experience is optimized through motivation.

 Finally. The First Full Day Octalysis Gamification Design Workshop

Both Online and In-Person Workshop

This workshop will be in dual mode. It will have a small and limited in-person workshop in San Francisco, accompanied with an Online Live version that is concurrent with the In-Person. It is obviously much more interactive in-person, but we will utilize tools to allow online attendees to watch both me and the slides, ask questions, and possible voice in questions for everyone to hear.

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The Beginner’s Guide to Gamification (19 of 90): White Hat vs Black Hat Gamification

The Mysteries of White Hat vs Black Hat Gamification

Up to this point, I have mostly been covering the foundation of my Octalysis framework, through blogposts, videos, and talks. I have finally covered enough that I am charting into new territories.

This is the first piece of work I’m sharing with the public that is specifically honed in on the topic of White Hat vs Black Hat Gamification.

Expect more to come, especially in my upcoming book Actionable Gamification: Beyond Points, Badges, and Leaderboards.

Guest Post: Octalysis Analysis of “Momentum”

 Guest Post: Octalysis Analysis of Momentum

An Octalysis Analysis of Momentum – The Journey

Today’s Octalysis Analysis is brought to you by our very own Octalysis Explorer, Mike Finney! 

Note-taking can be boring. Many times one starts a personal journal and then stops because it is not fun and thus not sustainable. Momentum takes a boring note-taking task and turns it into something meaningful, beautiful and fun!

Core Drive #1: Epic Meaning & Calling

Octalysis Score: 3

As part of the Onboarding phase, a screen launch image introduces the vision. The vision is “Your positive life experiences, moving you forward!”

A player’s quest is to “Ride the wave of your positive life experiences” by collecting them. The hot-air balloon soaring through the sky is fueled by his positive moments. Since the vision of the app is to help the player see himself in “… a more positive light…”, the player is on board with the vision of long-term happiness and is motivated to enter in a few notes.

The developer, Mindbloom, wants the player to have a long-term relationship with this intrinsic value app. To kick off the relationship, they want the player to enter in an uplifting note that is happy, reflective or something similar. In Hook Model terms, the developer wants the player to take action by entering in a note which also serves as an investment in the product. This will load the next external trigger which is a notification. The notification will fire when the balloon runs out of fuel and lands on the ground.

What follows the launch image are three introductory screens which says how to use the app and succeed. See “How To Use Momentum” figures below:

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Top 10 Most Popular Mobile Social Games

6959831753 051358c382 Top 10 Most Popular Mobile Social Games

Moments of downtime or dead time are an inevitable part of daily life but they don’t necessarily have to be dreadfully boring, especially with all of today’s awesome game apps.

You probably know how surprisingly fun these can be; according to a recent article in Forbes, games apps constitute the highest source of revenue on Google Play and Apple’s App Store.

There are many great apps available and even more being developed to help pass the time. Here are 10 popular favorites in no particular order:

Angry Birds

Angry birds logo Top 10 Most Popular Mobile Social Games

Angry birds is practically a household name and yet if I explained the game on paper (catapulting birds like weapons + destroying forts = fun), it may not sound ingenious nor very exciting. But many of you know that the game experience is very different; it is super easy to get addicted. Here are a few reasons:

  • It is simple and because it is simple, players feel accomplished and empowered early on- Core Drive #2 (Development & Accomplishment).
  • The game develops in a way that allows the players to feel a clear sense of progress which further ingrains their sense of achievement.
  • Players can compete with their friends. There is a strong drive to beat the other person and score higher (even if they are your girlfriend or boyfriend)- Core Drive #5 (Social Influence & Relatedness).

Temple Run

Temple Run Logo Top 10 Most Popular Mobile Social Games

Temple run is an adventure game. Players interact as an explorer character who steals an ancient mask and must must escape the wrath of demon monkeys. The touch screen controls allow the explorer to run as fast as possible, trying to avoid dangerous traps and obstacles such as trees and roots- Core Drive #8 (Loss & Avoidance). Players can move left or right. They can also duck, turn or jump as well.

There is now a Temple Run 2 which is based off the movie, Brave. The objective is to use archery to hit a target and collect coins. By the fourth day of its release, it had already been downloaded 20 million times!

Cut the Rope

Cut the Rope Logo 300x163 Top 10 Most Popular Mobile Social Games

Cut the rope is a puzzle game that utilizes mechanical physics. This is another example where the story and concept are lackluster compared to actual gameplay experience. Players are required to cut pieces of rope which are affixed to candy. The goal is to get the edibles into the mouth of a little round creature by solving puzzle challenges.

Sometimes the rope has to be cut at the right time. The candy might be attached to several pieces of rope which need to be cut in a certain order. Players are driven to keep overcoming past failures until they succeed. This is a great example of Core Drive #2 (Development & Accomplishment) and Core Drive #3 (Empowerment of Creativity & Feedback) which together instill a sense of empowerment and awesomeness.

The Room

The Room Logo 300x240 Top 10 Most Popular Mobile Social Games

The immediate appeal of the Room is the graphics which convey a sense of mystery and a supernatural air. Players are presented with a series of ornate looking objects that turn out to be individual puzzles that must be solved in order to progress. As the player solves puzzles, they learn more about a stranger named A.S.- Talk about Core Drive #7 (Unpredictability & Curiosity)!

As puzzle levels are solved, players occasionally glimpse into a different dimensions beyond their physical reality. Many people feel that the story line is not as compelling as the actual puzzle-solving which fosters a strong sense of Core Drive #2 (Development and Accomplishment) as well as Core Drive #3 (Empowerment of Creativity and Feedback).

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5 Great Serious Game Platforms For Corporations

Morf Media background design 5 Great Serious Game Platforms For CorporationsCourtesy of Morf Media

Many of you probably love to play games for recreation and entertainment. But as I have mentioned in my other posts, they can also be used to enhance and enrich educational experiences. These are called serious games.

The combination of learning and fun is a potent force in today’s corporate world. To generate innovation and maintain competitive edge, organizations need to align themselves with market changes, both domestically and globally. As far as processes are concerned, this means that employees must adapt by continuously learning new skills and sharpening their abilities to solve problems- just doing the job in the same routine fashion doesn’t lead to the same growth.

Traditional ways of teaching often mirror conventional classrooms. These include lectures with whiteboards, hand outs in the form of quizzes and surveys and instructional videos. Most people passively react to such formats. Participants may remember terms and information and they may be able to pass certain tests but this can offer a false sense of comfort as their ability to apply their new knowledge to actual, real-life problems remains untested.

Besides training team members, there is also the challenge of educating and training clients. Clients often need to have a deep level understanding of how a particular product works. If there are enormous technical complexities, the information can be particularly daunting and frustrating- not very good for maintaining a happy customer base.

And in addition to employees and clients, corporate decision-makers also need to maintain regular learning initiatives to understand the perspectives and preferences of their clients. And with these insights, they must continuously make decisions to develop their products so that they are relevant to the needs of their customers.

All these objectives require effective learning where information is quickly assimilated in order to be applied for the best possible results.  Very little time can be afforded to make transitions from conceptual knowledge to astute action. This is where the power of games can make a huge difference.

Here are five companies (in no ranking order) who are dedicated to developing software and platforms that optimize learning experiences through game mechanics.

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